Our Winter 2017 Issue

Last Updated December 14, 2017
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When you stop to think about it, we observe to a pretty crazy calendar on the Cape. For ten weeks—from Memorial Day to Labor Day—the pace of life here ratchets up several notches as we accommodate the swell of summer residents and tourists. Roads become more congested; restaurants, shops and grocery stores teem with customers; and out-of-town company cycles through our guest rooms. We barely have time to recover from summer when the holidays arrive. After the mad dash from Halloween to New Year’s Eve, I, for one, am ready to recharge my batteries and catch up on my reading. I’m really looking forward to checking out some of the suggestions for books and viewing programs Michelle Koch solicited from farmers and fellow foodies in her article, Media for Mulling. In particular, I’m intrigued by The Lean Farm: How to Minimize Waste, Increase Efficiency, and Maximize Value and Profits with Less Work. I’d love to know how to get more out of my garden with less sweat equity!

I also plan to spend more time in the kitchen in the coming months. I am going to break out the fondue pot (yes!) and brush up on my puff pastry making skills. John Carafoli provides two recipes for one-pot meals that are perfect for the long, cold nights ahead. We haven’t tackled feijoada yet, but every winter we host a cassoulet dinner that is a popular ticket among friends and family. Constructing a dish over a couple of days is definitely more manageable when there are fewer distractions. And, in the case of these two dishes, the result is the perfect meal to share with a crowd. We encourage you to give one or both of these recipes a try. With all the ingredients for feijoada so close at hand, perhaps this year we’ll swerve to Brazil instead of France for our mid-winter feast.

This past summer we put out a request to our regular contributors to suggest candidates for a story about an accomplished home cook. Most of the suggestions we got were for people professionally involved in the food service industry. We had something else in mind altogether, so we were delighted to get Aline Lindemann’s pitch about Art Hultin, a general contractor on the outer Cape whose homemade hot sauce mutates over the season depending on the output from his two organic gardens. We’d love to create a regular feature about talented home cooks, especially those who put in the extra effort. If you know someone who makes their own charcuterie, pasta or bread; hosts an annual pig roast; or creates pâtés from fish they’ve caught and smoked themselves, we’d love to hear from you.

Finally, it can’t be said enough that there would be no Edible Cape Cod without our loyal advertisers. Putting out a magazine that relies solely on the paid advertisements in the offseason is a challenge; many businesses prefer to spend their limited ad dollars during the peak summer and fall seasons. The businesses in this issue are the only reason you are holding this free copy of Edible Cape Cod in your hands. So, please, thank those businesses for supporting us and support them with your business.

See you in the spring!

Dianne Langeland

Shoal Hope Ciderworks

A hobby develops into a passion that ultimately launches a business. This familiar trajectory is playing out in a small business bay behind...

Wampanoag Shells

Growing up on Cape Cod, Marcus Hendricks spent as much time as he could outdoors and on the water. He’d head out to the quahog flats with...

Chatham Coastal Creations

Pan-seared in brown butter. Baked au gratin. Tossed with capers and lemon. Wrapped in bacon. There are so many ways to enjoy local Cape Cod...

Local Cheer: What’s brewing on Cape Cod

Water. Hops. Grains. Yeast. The four main ingredients of beer are what bind the growing craft beer community on Cape Cod. The commonality...

Pleasant Lake Farm

Two friendly dogs welcomed us at Pleasant Lake Farm in Harwich on an overcast day at the end of August. Nitka was large, brown and friendly...

Cassoulet and Feijoada

Dishes for a Cold Winter Day When winter and cold weather roll around, it’s time to cook heartwarming, savory dishes: casseroles baked in...

Some Like it Hotter

During a summer stroll on the outer beach, I bumped into my old friend Adrian who was camped out with his family for the night. He showed...

Fruitcake

FAUXTANICALS

Feeding the Community

On a warm October morning vans and trucks pull up from Cape Cod food pantries and supplemental nutrition programs to pick up plastic bins...

Nourishing the Body and the Soul

Within the last five years, the Lower Cape has become a speculative breeding ground for health-conscious establishments. From food trucks...

Bear in the Boots Gastropub

On a corner of Main Street in Falmouth, a team of fun-loving foodies go the extra mile to create innovative comfort food that wouldn’t be...

Tumi's Peruvian-Style Ceviche

In the early chill of winter 2014, a Peruvian elementary school teacher named Daisy Soto and her chef/husband Jorge Siguencia opened their...

Capturing the Summer Sun

In regions of the world where people endure long, dark winters, particularly those of Slavic cultures, many have learned a way through...

Media for Mulling

Ideas for Winter Pondering Ask local farmers and foodies to name the books, websites, videos and more that have impassioned them, and a...

Edible Reads Winter 2017

North Truro resident and author Tricia Cohen teamed up with author/illustrator Lisa Graves for A Thyme to Discover: Early American Recipes...
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