Our Spring 2018 Issue

Last Updated May 09, 2018
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About a dozen years ago I resigned from the board of a local land trust when it turned down the request from a highly respected farmer in town to lease the property we had just “saved from development” through a major fundraising campaign. Ironically, the property had the word “farm” in its name, yet the land trust was adamant it would be left as open space. This was when the local food movement on the Cape was just taking off and the number of local farms was dwindling. Then, as now, the availability of affordable, arable land was a major impediment to individuals looking to farm. It didn’t seem good form for the editor of a local food magazine to sit on the board of an organization whose actions were in direct conflict with our mission at Edible Cape Cod.

Imagine my delight, then, in reading Michelle Koch’s article about a town-led effort in Orleans to purchase a historic farming property and, after years of thoughtful planning, rehabilitation and restoration, lease 1500-square-foot parcels to individuals drawn by lottery for the express purpose of gardening. According to Alan McClennen, one of the leading players of this effort, inserting flexible language for the use of the land was key. We look forward to tracking the progress of this project and sincerely hope that it serves as a model for other towns and land trusts across the Cape.

Elsewhere in this issue, Larry Egan writes about an energetic young couple that took over Cape Cod Winery a few years ago and almost immediately had to find new land on which to plant their vines after the lease on the original property expired. Andrea Pyenson introduces us to the Cape’s four female shellfish constables and the challenges they face on the job. And Susan Fernald brings us up to date on our local Slow Food convivium. We’ve also got some great recipes throughout the magazine, including several for our favorite spring crop, asparagus.

One of the greatest joys of this/our job is the opportunity it provides to meet some amazing people who might not normally cross our path. In the earliest days of publishing this magazine, when we spent every Wednesday morning in summers at the (now defunct) Mid-Cape Farmers’ Market, we got to know Ned and Sue Handy, who were regular shoppers. The Handys were well known in town; Ned served on many local not-for-profit boards and had also published two books about Barnstable. He was also a big fan of Edible Cape Cod and eventually contributed a wonderful article about his grandmother, Amy Littlefield Handy, single mother, farmer, keeper of bees and turkeys, author, artist and patriot, in Ned’s words. Doug and I spent a lovely afternoon with Ned and Sue in their Barnstable home looking at vintage posters from the U.S. Food Administration during WWI that his grandmother had preserved in a map chest. Ned always talked about writing another article for us. Sadly, he passed away this past winter before he got around to writing it.

We’re grateful for the people we meet, and for the spring that the Cape brings to us...

Through the Pass: Mom & Pops

If Tom Deegan had any fears about entering the restaurant industry despite a lack of experience, they didn’t deter him. Tom had faith that...

The Skinny on Asparagus

When my son was very young he was a binge eater. One fall he ate tomatoes and apples. Just tomatoes and apples. The following winter it was...

Taking it Slow

Catching up with the Cape’s Slow Food Convivium For nearly three decades, the Slow Food movement has celebrated and recognized the value...

In Pursuit of Perfection

RETURNING TO PARIS TO RECHARGE & REVIVE A PASSION FOR PASTRY   Seasonal business is not for the weak of heart. Or mind, for that...

Growing Space

Creating Accessible Farmland Weather, weeds and pests. Working farmers face incredible foes, not to mention the public’s changing desires...

Pole Bean Renaissance

Italian Renaissance gourmet Bartholomew Scappi, author of the monumental cookbook published in 1570, Opera dell’Arte del Cucinare (...

Cape Cod's Female Shellfish Constables

Looking out over the perfectly still waters of Blackfish Creek in Wellfleet on a crisp March afternoon, it’s hard to believe that a vicious...

Thriving on the Vine

In 1994, Tony and Kristina Lazzari leased a plot of land along Sandwich Road in Falmouth, planted rows and rows of grape vines over the...

Beyond the Plate

A first-ever gathering for local food lovers, “Beyond the Plate: A Symposium of Food, Writing and Community” will be hosted by the Truro...

Edible Reads Spring 2018

Have you ever found yourself quietly humming the old Thompson’s Clam Bar jingle while driving past Wynchmere Harbor in Harwich Port? If you...

Brechka Boards

For some, retiring means stepping away from a career, never to return. Alan Brechka, on the other hand, left the classroom while never...

Plant Workshop

Set to blossom in late May is Plant Work Shop, an Orleans brick and mortar showcasing the herbal skin and home care line of Milisa Moses....

Last Call

Mai Tai at Cleat & Anchor Normally, I am suspicious of any batch-made adult beverages: margaritas from a soda gun, sangrias languishing...

Plant a seed for change

The Plant a Seed kit contains the Three Sisters—beans, corn and squash—that, when planted together, help one another thrive and survive....
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